Archive

Archive for the ‘Azure’ Category

Azure Point-2-Site VPN Failed: ERROR 798

September 19, 2014 Leave a comment

While trying to connect to Azure Network via Windows Based VPN client (Point-2-Site) and connection Failed (ERROR 798):

A certificate could not be found that can be used with this Extensible Authentication Protocol. (Error 798)

What is Azure Point-2-Site?

Point-to-site connections let you connect from a single computer to Microsoft Azure Virtual Network. It uses the Windows VPN client. As part of the point-to-site configuration, you install a certificate and a VPN client configuration package, which contains the settings that allow your computer to securely connect to any virtual machine within the virtual network.

How do we fix the problem?

Azure VPN client package is LOCKED and it won’t allow us to make any chances to existing settings. Here is the workaround to fix this issue by manually creating a VPN connection on client machine.

“Assuming VPN Client Cert (.pfx) is already imported into “My user Account/Personal/Certificate”

Instructions are as follow:

1. Find Azure Gateway Host address: First thing to begin with, identify target Azure Gateway Address.

Launch Network Connection:

Start —>Run—> type “Ncpa.cpl”

Change Network Connection view to “Details”.

Locate VPN Connection and Confirm Azure Gateway FQDN under “Phone# or Host Address”

Gateway Example: “azuregateway-xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxx-xxxxx.cloudapp.net”

clip_image002

2. Create a New Azure VPN connection (Manually):

“Open Network and Sharing Center”

Launch “Set up a new Connection or Network”

clip_image004

Select “Connect to a workspace” and Click on “Next

clip_image006

Select “No, create a new connection” and Click on “Next”

clip_image008

Click on “Use my Internet Connection (VPN)”

clip_image010

Enter Azure Gateway details:

Internet Address: azuregateway-xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxx-xxxxx.cloudapp.net

Destination name: “ENTER USER FRIENDLY CONNECTIPN NAME”

Check “Don’t Destination Name: connect now; just set it up so I can connect Later”

And click on “Next”

 

clip_image012 

Leave everything BLANK (Authentication will happen from VPN Client Cert)

Click on “Create” and “Close”

clip_image014

clip_image016

3. Modify VPN Setting:

Go to Network Connection

Select new VPN connection

Right Click and go to “Properties”

clip_image018

In VPN connection Properties, go to “Security” Tab

In Authentication, select Use Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)

Select “Microsoft: Smart Card or other certificates (encryption enabled)” and click “Properties

clip_image020

                  

In “When connecting“, select “Use a certificate on this computer” and click OK

clip_image022

In Networking Tab, Select “Internet Protocol version 4” and click “Properties”

clip_image024

In General tab, Click on “Advanced

clip_image026

In IP Setting tab, uncheck “Use default gateway on remote network“.

Click OK, OK and OK.

clip_image028

All done.

Now try connecting to Azure VPN:

clip_image030

Select appropriate VPN Client Certificate.

clip_image032

And we are CONNECTED.

clip_image034

You can check VPN connection IP by ipconfig:

“PPP Adapter VPN Connection

clip_image036

Now client machine is securely connecting to Azure Gateway using Point-2-Site (VPN).

Cheers!

Puneet

 

How to add Azure SQL Database custom alert queries in SCOM

March 31, 2014 Leave a comment

In this blog, I will focus on Two State / Three State monitor in SCOM for Windows Azure SQL Database. In my previous blog, I talked about custom queries can be defined in Authoring console with option to create Two state or Three State monitoring Windows Azure SQL database. Now let me walkthrough the process.

Scenario: Alerts Notification for deadlocks in Windows Azure SQL database, We are going to create two state monitor alert for Deadlocks count exceeding > 0.

In the Operation Manager Console, go to “Authoring” Under Management Packs Objects.

Right Click on Monitor –> Create a Monitor –> Unit Monitor

clip_image001

 In “Select a monitor type” wizard. Expand Windows Azure SQL Database.

Select “User-defined SQL Query Two State Monitor” and Select Designation Management Pack 

clip_image002

Click Next. In the General Properties. Enter: “specific friendly name

Monitor Target” select target Windows Azure SQL database”

Enabled Monitor

clip_image003

 In SQL Query: Database: “master”. (Deadlock query runs in Master database)

Query: type SQL query with SQL Database name

select count(*) as Count from sys.event_log

where database_name = ‘Enter SQL database Name

and event_type=’deadlock’

clip_image004

 Test Condition: Select Scalar Value

clip_image005

In Test condition: Enter Friend Name. In Cell Value: Equal to 0.

 (Value 0 will be the normal status without deadlock. Moment deadlock occur, value will not match with defined value. It will cause Critical Alert Notification)

clip_image006clip_image007

Configure your schedule: 15 min.

(Here SQL query will run every 15 min to verify the defined value)

clip_image008

Click on Next. Leave Configure Health as default and click on Next.

clip_image009

Configure Alerts Setting:

Check Generate alert for Monitor

Alert Name: Specify Friendly alert name and click on Create.

clip_image010

Now custom alert is configured for any deadlock occur in Azure SQL Database. You can use the same procedure for any custom alert using SQL query and Two/ Three State Monitor. Hope this will gives few pointer and custom alert management using SCOM.

Happy Reading!

Puneet

Windows Azure SQL database Performance and diagnostics and SCOM

March 31, 2014 Comments off

In my previous blog, I covered in-depth on installation and configuration System Center Operation Manager 2012 R2 and monitoring Windows Azure Environment. I want to extend the conversation on Windows Azure SQL Database Performance Monitoring and Diagnostics. Current available Windows Azure SQL database Management pack version 1.5.4.0 published on 07-05-2013  for SCOM. Provides capabilities to discover, monitor, and manage your Windows Azure SQL Databases. After configuration, the Microsoft Windows Azure SQL Database Monitoring Management Pack offers the following functionalities:

User-friendly wizard to discover Windows Azure SQL Database servers

• Provides availability status of Windows Azure SQL Database server. SLA Dashboard.

• Collects and monitors health of Windows Azure SQL Database databases.

• Space monitoring, Used space, Free space, Total allocated quota

• Track the total number of databases per server, Number of database sessions

• Collects and monitors performance information, Average memory per session

• Total memory per session, Total CPU time per session, Total I/O per session

• Maximum Transaction execution time, Max. Transaction lock count, Max. Transaction log space used

• Network Egress/Ingress bandwidth

• Ability to define Custom thresholds for each monitor to configure the warning and critical alerts.

• Run-as profile to securely connect to Windows Azure SQL Database.

• Detailed knowledge to guide the IT operator with troubleshooting the problem

• Custom tasks to redirect the user to the Windows Azure SQL Database online portal

• Custom query support to enable application-specific availability and performance monitoring

 Below Screen shots captured System Center Operation Manager 2012 R2 monitoring Windows Azure SQL Database

 clip_image001Windows Azure SQL Database SLA dashboard in SCOM

clip_image002

Windows Azure Performance Dashboard in SCOM

clip_image003

Windows Azure Performance Counters in SCOM

In addition to standard health and performance monitoring of the Windows Azure SQL Database cloud service, you can define custom SQL queries to be executed. This allows you to monitor your application‑specific health.

Custom queries can be defined in Authoring console with option to create Two state or Three State monitoring Windows Azure SQL database.

clip_image004

Beyond SCOM standard and custom Monitoring, we can leverage SCOM Reporting Server for lengthy Performance and Diagnostics Azure SQL custom queries.

Performance and Diagnostics Queries for SQL Azure Databases

Top 10 Most CPU intensive queries

SELECT TOP 10 query_stats.query_hash AS \”QueryHash\”,

SUM(query_stats.total_worker_time) / SUM(query_stats.execution_count) AS \”AvgCPUTime\”,

MIN(query_stats.statement_text) AS \”StatementText\”

FROM

 (SELECT QS.*,

 SUBSTRING(ST.text, (QS.statement_start_offset/2) + 1,

 ((CASE statement_end_offset

 WHEN -1 THEN DATALENGTH(st.text)

 ELSE QS.statement_end_offset END

 – QS.statement_start_offset)/2) + 1) AS statement_text

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS QS

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(QS.sql_handle) as ST) as query_stats

 GROUP BY query_stats.query_hash

 ORDER BY 2 DESC

Top 10 Most Resource Intensive Queries

SELECT highest_cpu_queries.plan_handle, highest_cpu_queries.total_worker_time, q.dbid,

 q.objectid, q.number, q.encrypted, q.[text]

 FROM

 (SELECT TOP 10 qs.plan_handle, qs.total_worker_time

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs

 ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time desc) AS highest_cpu_queries

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS q

 ORDER BY highest_cpu_queries.total_worker_time desc”;

Current Connection Info

SELECT e.connection_id, s.session_id, s.login_name, s.last_request_end_time, s.cpu_time

 FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions s INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections e ON s.session_id = e.session_id

Top 10 Running Queries having the Longest Total Elapsed Time & are Blocking Other Queries

SELECT TOP 10 r.session_id, r.plan_handle, r.sql_handle, r.request_id, r.start_time, r.status,

 r.command, r.database_id, r.user_id, r.wait_type, r.wait_time, r.last_wait_type,

 r.wait_resource, r.total_elapsed_time, r.cpu_time, r.transaction_isolation_level, r.row_count, st.text

 FROM sys.dm_exec_requests r

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.sql_handle) as st

 WHERE r.blocking_session_id = 0

 and r.session_id in

 (SELECT distinct(blocking_session_id) FROM sys.dm_exec_requests)

 GROUP BY r.session_id, r.plan_handle, r.sql_handle, r.request_id, r.start_time, r.status,

 r.command, r.database_id, r.user_id, r.wait_type, r.wait_time, r.last_wait_type,

 r.wait_resource, r.total_elapsed_time, r.cpu_time, r.transaction_isolation_level,r.row_count, st.text

 ORDER BY r.total_elapsed_time desc

 Row Count Aggregate Information (total rows, min rows, max rows and last rows) for Queries

 SELECT qs.execution_count,

 SUBSTRING(qt.text,qs.statement_start_offset/2 +1,

 (CASE WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1

 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.text)) * 2

 ELSE qs.statement_end_offset end -

 qs.statement_start_offset

 )/2

 ) AS query_text,

 qt.dbid, dbname= DB_NAME (qt.dbid), qt.objectid,

 qs.total_rows, qs.last_rows, qs.min_rows, qs.max_rows

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt

 WHERE qt.text like ‘%SELECT%’

ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC;

Top 10 Most Expensive Queries by Logical Reads

SELECT TOP 10 SUBSTRING(qt.TEXT, (qs.statement_start_offset/2)+1,

 ((CASE qs.statement_end_offset

 WHEN -1 THEN DATALENGTH(qt.TEXT)

 ELSE qs.statement_end_offset

 END – qs.statement_start_offset)/2)+1) SQLStatement,

 qs.execution_count,

 qs.total_logical_reads, qs.last_logical_reads,

 qs.total_logical_writes, qs.last_logical_writes,

 qs.total_worker_time,

 qs.last_worker_time,

 qs.total_elapsed_time/1000000 total_elapsed_time_in_S,

 qs.last_elapsed_time/1000000 last_elapsed_time_in_S,

 qs.last_execution_time,

 qp.query_plan

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) qt

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) qp

 ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC

Top 10 Most Expensive Queries by Logical Writes

SELECT TOP 10 SUBSTRING(qt.TEXT, (qs.statement_start_offset/2)+1,

 ((CASE qs.statement_end_offset

 WHEN -1 THEN DATALENGTH(qt.TEXT)

 ELSE qs.statement_end_offset

 END – qs.statement_start_offset)/2)+1) SQLStatement,

 qs.execution_count,

 qs.total_logical_reads, qs.last_logical_reads,

 qs.total_logical_writes, qs.last_logical_writes,

 qs.total_worker_time,

 qs.last_worker_time,

 qs.total_elapsed_time/1000000 total_elapsed_time_in_S,

 qs.last_elapsed_time/1000000 last_elapsed_time_in_S,

 qs.last_execution_time,

 qp.query_plan

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) qt

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) qp

 ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC

Top 10 Most Expensive Queries by Worker Time

 SELECT TOP 10 SUBSTRING(qt.TEXT, (qs.statement_start_offset/2)+1,

 ((CASE qs.statement_end_offset

 WHEN -1 THEN DATALENGTH(qt.TEXT)

 ELSE qs.statement_end_offset

 END – qs.statement_start_offset)/2)+1) SQLStatement,

 qs.execution_count,

 qs.total_logical_reads, qs.last_logical_reads,

 qs.total_logical_writes, qs.last_logical_writes,

 qs.total_worker_time,

 qs.last_worker_time,

 qs.total_elapsed_time/1000000 total_elapsed_time_in_S,

 qs.last_elapsed_time/1000000 last_elapsed_time_in_S,

 qs.last_execution_time,

 qp.query_plan

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) qt

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) qp

 ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC

Queries Taking Longest Elapsed Time

SELECT TOP 10

 qs.total_elapsed_time / qs.execution_count / 1000000.0 AS average_seconds,

 qs.total_elapsed_time / 1000000.0 AS total_seconds,

 qs.execution_count,

 SUBSTRING (qt.text,qs.statement_start_offset/2,

 (CASE WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1

 THEN LEN(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX), qt.text)) * 2

 ELSE

 qs.statement_end_offset

 END

 – qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS individual_query,

 o.name AS object_name,

 DB_NAME(qt.dbid) AS database_name

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) as qt

 LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.objects o ON qt.objectid = o.object_id

 where qt.dbid = DB_ID()

 ORDER BY average_seconds DESC;

 Queries doing the Most I/O

 SELECT TOP 10

 (total_logical_reads + total_logical_writes) / qs.execution_count AS average_IO,

 (total_logical_reads + total_logical_writes) AS total_IO,

 qs.execution_count AS execution_count,

 SUBSTRING (qt.text,qs.statement_start_offset/2,

 (CASE WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1

 THEN LEN(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX), qt.text)) * 2

 ELSE qs.statement_end_offset END – qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS indivudual_query,

 o.name AS object_name,

 DB_NAME(qt.dbid) AS database_name

 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs

 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) as qt

 LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.objects o ON qt.objectid = o.object_id

 where qt.dbid = DB_ID()

 ORDER BY average_IO DESC;

Calculate the Database Size (MB)

 SELECT SUM(reserved_page_count) * 8192 / 1024 / 1024 as DatabaseSize FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats

The above will provide extensive performance and diagnostic metrics for Windows Azure SQL database.

Happy Reading!

Puneet

Part 2: SCOM 2012 monitoring Windows Azure

March 27, 2014 Comments off

In Part 1, we covered Installation of SCOM 2012 in Windows Azure. Now we will configure SCOM to Monitoring Windows Azure Environment.

  1. Windows Azure Virtual Machines
  2. Windows Azure Storage
  3. Windows Azure SQL Database.

Pre-requisite:

SCOM 2012 Management Server

Windows Azure Subscription (Active)

Certification for secure connection.

Management Packs

Environment: In my test environment, I have 2 VMs running in Windows Azure.

SCOMDC1- running Contoso.com domain controller

Opsmgr2012r2 – System Center operation manager 2012 R2. We covered the VM and SCOM installation process in Part1.

clip_image001

Let’s get Started

  1. Create Self Sign Certificates: In our scenario, we will use Self Sign Certificate from IIS Server.

Go to Run and Type "inetmgr"

Select on the Server name and Click on "Server Certificate"

clip_image002

From Server Certificate console, Click on "Create Self-Signed Certificate"

clip_image003

Enter Friendly Name for the certificate and Click on OK.

clip_image004

New Self Signed Certificate will be listed in the Server Certificates Console.

clip_image005

Now Export the certificate with and without Private key from Cert Mgr Console:

Go to Run – type "certmgr.msc"

Locate the certificate under "Trusted Root Certification Authorities/Certificate"

Select the certificate, Right Click–>All Tasks –>Export

clip_image006

Certificate Export Wizard click on Next.

Select "No, do not export the Private Key", Click on Next.

clip_image007

Choose the default setting and click on Next.

Click on Browse and Specific the name and location where you want to save (*.cer) the file.

Repeat the same step again to export the same Certificate with Private Key.

Select "Yes, export the private key", Click on Next.

clip_image008

Choose the default setting and click on Next.

Check Password and Enter Secret Password

clip_image009

Click on Browse and Specific the name and location where you want to save (*.pfx) the file.

Finally we have Self Signed Certificate with (.pfx) ad without (.cer) private key.

  1. Download management packs:
    • System Center Management Pack for Windows Azure

http://www.microsoft.com/en-in/download/details.aspx?id=38414

  • Windows Azure SQL Database Management Pack for System Center 2012

http://www.microsoft.com/en-in/download/details.aspx?id=38829

Download and Save it on SCOM Server.

  1.  Extract and Import Management Pack

Extract both MPs (.msi) on local server. Default location is C:\Program Files (x86)\System Center Management Packs

clip_image010

After extracting, you can locate MPs file with (.mpb) in destination folders;

clip_image011

Now Import following MP files in SCOM 2012:

Microsoft.SystemCenter.WindowsAzure.mpb

Microsoft.SystemCenter.WindowsAzure.SLA.mpb

Microsoft.SqlServer.Azure.mpb

Launch SCOM Console. Go to Administration panel–> Right Click Management Packs –> Select Import Management Packs.

clip_image012

From Select Management Packs — Click and Add and Add from Disk.

clip_image013

Browse and Add Windows Azure Management Packs. Then Install.

clip_image014

Successful Imported MP listed under Management Packs.

clip_image015

Windows Azure and Windows Azure SQL Database will be listed under Monitoring Panel.

clip_image016

  1.  Import Self Signed Certification in Windows Azure Subscription

Logon to Windows Azure Portalhttps://manage.windowsazure.com/

Go to SETTINGS and Click on Management Certificates

Click on UPLOAD.

clip_image017

** Upload Self Sign Certificated (.cer) created in Step 1.

clip_image018

  1. Add Windows Azure Subscription in SCOM Server

Now let’s addWindows Azure Subscription in SCOM Server to monitoring Windows Azure.

Open SCOM Console. Go to Administration Panel and Click on Windows Azure.

clip_image019

Click on Add Subscription.

clip_image020

Input required

Windows Azure Subscription ID.

Certificate: Browse Self Signed certificate (.pfx) created in Step 1.

Password: Enter Password provided at the time of export.

Click on Next and select Management pool.

Click on Add Subscription.

View added Windows Azure Subscription.

clip_image021

  1. Create Windows Azure and Windows Azure SQL Database custom Management Packs

After Adding Windows Azure Subscription in SCOM. Now we will focus on Monitoring Windows Azure.

In SCOM Console. Go to Authoring and locate Windows Azure Monitoring and Windows Azure SQL Database under Management Pack templates.

clip_image022

First, start with Windows Azure Monitoring.

Right click on Window Azure Monitoring –> Add Monitoring Wizard… —> From Select the monitoring type

Select Windows Azure Monitoring and click Next

clip_image023

Specify Friendly Name and Select or Create new Management group. Click on Next

clip_image024

Select Added Subscription for dropdown and click on Next

clip_image025

On Cloud Services, click on search and select listed Cloud Services that need to monitor. NEXT

On Virtual Machine, Click on Search and Select listed Virtual Machine. Click on OK and Next

clip_image026

On Storage, Click on Search and Select listed Storage account. Click on OK and Next.

Click on Finished.

Repeat the same steps for Windows Azure SQL Database.

Right click on Window Azure Monitoring –> Add Monitoring Wizard… —> From Select the monitoring type. Select Windows Azure SQL Database Monitoring and click Next

clip_image027

Specify Friendly Name and Select or Create new Management group. Click on Next

On Server details, Enter Windows Azure SQL database name and credential.

clip_image028

I have already created Run as Account with Azure SQL database credentials.

Select Proxy Agent: Server that has access to internet and able to communicate with Windows Azure SQL database.   Click on create..

  1. Discover and Monitor Windows Azure and Windows Azure SQL database.

After Management Pack for Window Azure is created.

It will discovery WA resources like Cloud Services, Virtual Machine and Storage..

clip_image029

        Discover Windows Azure SQL database Server:

clip_image030

It will take few min to sync with WA and display health status and metrics.

clip_image031

Finally System Center will start monitoring Windows Azure Environment.

 

Happy reading!

Puneet

http://www.linkedin.com/in/puneetv

New improvements in Microsoft Windows Azure.

March 27, 2014 Comments off

Recently Microsoft added new features and Functionality in Microsoft Windows Azure. New improvements listed in Windows Azure:

 

  • Two new Windows Azure Datacenter (Japan East and Japan West)
  • Oracle software General Availability in Windows Azure
  • Traffic Manager Update Support Windows Azure Web Sites.
  • New Compute Intensive Instances (A8 and A9) for PAAS
  • ExpressRoute (Preview)
  • VM agent for Windows Azure Virtual Machines
  • Management: Co-admin limit increased from 10->200 users

 

New Windows Azure Datacenter

Microsoft added two new Datacenter in Japan East (Saitama Prefecture) and Japan West (Osaka Prefecture).

10 Windows Azure Datacenter across the geographical region:

 

clip_image001

 

Please see service availability by region.

 

Oracle software General Availability in Windows Azure:

Oracle Database, Oracle WebLogic Server and Java are now generally available in Microsoft Windows Azure. Oracle software licenses are included with the VM images and can be accessed in the Windows Azure Management Console. When logging in, administrators can click New, then select Compute, followed by Virtual Machine and then From Gallery and select Oracle images:

 

Oracle Databases

•Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition on Windows Server 2012

•Oracle Database 12c Standard Edition on Windows Server 2012

•Oracle Database 11g R2 Enterprise Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2

•Oracle Database 11g R2 Standard Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2

 

Weblogic

•Oracle WebLogic Server 12c Enterprise Edition on Windows Server 2012

•Oracle WebLogic Server 12c Standard Edition on Windows Server 2012

•Oracle WebLogic Server 11g Enterprise Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2

•Oracle WebLogic Server 11g Standard Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2

 

Combined Oracle Database/Weblogic VM Images

•Oracle Database 12c and WebLogic Server 12c Enterprise Edition on Windows Server 2012

•Oracle Database 12c and WebLogic Server 12c Standard Edition on Windows Server 2012

•Oracle Database 11g and WebLogic Server 11g Enterprise Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2

•Oracle Database 11g and WebLogic Server 11g Standard Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2

 

Check out Oracle pricing in Windows Azure

http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/pricing/details/virtual-machines/#oracle-software

 

Traffic Manager Update Support Windows Azure Web Sites

Windows Azure Traffic Manager now supports Azure websites as endpoints, in addition to cloud services. With this update, customers can get the benefits of load balancing or redirection of web traffic across multiple regions using the performance, failover or round-robin Traffic Manager rules.

 

For more information, visit:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/hh744833.aspx 

 

New Compute Intensive Instances (A8 and A9)

Initially New high performance computer instance is only available for Cloud Services (PAAS) deployment and in Europe West region.  These instances include an additional 40Gbit/s InfiniBand network that provides remote direct memory access (RDMA) technology for maximum efficiency of parallel Message Passing Interface (MPI) applications. The InfiniBand network can be used for high performance applications that require a low latency and high throughput communication between compute instances.

 

Name

Virtual Cores

Ram

A8

8

56GB

A9

16

112GB

 

For FAQ, visit:

http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/pricing/details/cloud-services/

 

ExpressRoute (Preview)

Windows Azure ExpressRoute is in PREVIEW . It enables dedicated, private, high-throughput network connectivity between Azure datacenters and your on-premises IT environments. Using ExpressRoute, you can connect your existing datacenters to Azure without having to flow any traffic over the public Internet, and offer more reliability, faster speeds, lower latencies and higher security than typical connections over the Internet. In some cases, using ExpressRoute connections to transfer data between on-premises and Azure can also yield significant cost benefits.

 

When creating a new Virtual Network, you now have the option to configure ExpressRoute when selecting the Site-To-Site VPN option:

 

clip_image002

 

With ExpressRoute, you can establish connections to Azure at an ExpressRoute location (Exchange Provider facility) or directly connect to Azure from your existing WAN network (such as a MPLS VPN) provided by a network service provider.

ExpressRoute is available in the US from Microsoft’s partnering service companies, including AT&T, Equinix and Level3.

ExpressRoute FAQ

Pricing Details

 

VM agent for Windows Azure Virtual Machines

Hanu bloggers Pravin Desai has covered the topic in-depth in his blog post:

VM Agent Display System Info for Azure VMs

 

Management: Co-admin limit increased from 10 to 200 users

Each Windows Azure subscription now supports the inclusion of up to 200 co-administrators per account, up from 10 persons.

 

Happy Reading!

Puneet

http://www.linkedin.com/in/puneetv

 

 

 

Supported Guest Operation System and Applications in Windows Azure (IAAS) and Now Oracle on Windows Azure

September 25, 2013 Leave a comment

This blog focus of Windows Azure (IAAS) and list of Supported Guest Windows and Non Windows server and Server Application in Windows Azure (IAAS) platform:

clip_image001

** Only Guest OS Family 2 and 3 is supported.

A “Guest OS family” refers to Windows Server operating system release that a Guest OS is based on. For example, family 1 is based on Windows Server 2008, family 2 is based on Windows Server 2008 R2 and family 3 is based on Windows Server 2012.

June 19, 2013 – Microsoft officially announced the retirement of Guest OS family 1 (compatible with Windows Server 2008 SP2) on June 1, 2013. If you are still using Guest OS family 1, please read the retirement policy contained elsewhere on this page to understand the series of events occurring during retirement. These events include limitations of new deployments on January 1, 2014 and the forced shutdown or update of your Cloud Service on June 1, 2014.

From <http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/ee924680.aspx>

Non-Windows OS supported:

clip_image002

Windows Server 2008 R2 and later versions are supported for the following roles.

clip_image003

Oracle on Windows Azure

Recently Announced Partnership between Microsoft and Oracle.  Now, customers can deploy pre-configured virtual machine images running various combinations of Oracle Database, Oracle WebLogic Server, and Java Platform SE on Windows Server, with licenses for the Oracle software included. During the preview, these images are offered for no additional charge beyond the regular compute costs. After the preview period ends, Oracle images will be billed based on the total number of minutes VMs run in a month; details on the VM pricing to be announced at a later. 

clip_image004

FAQ for Windows Client OS in Windows Azure:

Can customers rent Windows Client desktops on Windows Azure or other Service providers?

No, multi-tenant hosting is restricted in the Product Use Rights of Windows Client, such as Windows 7 or Windows 8. Windows Client Desktops are not available on either Windows Azure or on any other Service Provider such as Amazon or Rackspace. You can read more about the Microsoft Product Use Rights here.

Happy Reading!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 30 other followers